Saturday, December 23, 2006

His Grace speaks out



Christians in the Middle East are being put at risk by the Government's "short-sighted" and "ignorant" policy in Iraq, the Archbishop of Canturbury has said.
Writing in The Times, Dr Rowan Williams said attacks on Christian believers in the region are increasing, and the Government should have a strategy for helping them.
The Turkish constitution guarantees religious freedom and Christians are allowed to practice their religion but many feel their religious rights are severely limited in the predominantly Muslim country.Remember Turkey's Christians while you are enjoying the Christmas holiday.

'hoping you have a very happy and peaceful Christmas wherever you happen to be.And very Best Wishes for 2007...

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

You have said nothing about the persecuted Yolnir following minority. I guess that shows your cultural bias!

Anonymous said...

I had no idea you did all this clever stuff. I noticed the Arch bishs embarrassingly ignorant and selfish nonsense.
Iraq has been badly handled by Blair but abandoning the US at that point was not on.Naturally we are going to be safer if we do not resist ......for now (says Sparky`s piano)


IMHO ..I mean

istanbultory said...

The Foreign Office has rebuked Rowan Williams for accusing the government of a 'shortsighted' and 'ignorant' policy in Iraq. Obviously, the FO is a stronger voice of moral authority than the Archbishop. Obviously......

Colin said...

Merry Christmas in Turkey, Instanbultory.

Voyager said...

I find it tragic that 1300 years of happy-go-lucky Christian-Islamic relationships fell apart over the toppling of a sadistic tyrant in Iraq.

I can see the Rowan has read Hamlet and internalised the message........that doing nothing is better than upsetting the balance.

He is living proof of the danger of prolonging the undergraduate experience into teaching rather than experiencing the world as it is...........had he been a missionary in India or attached himself to persecuted Christians in the Middle East or Pakistan or China he might have recognised their situation beyond the superficial.

I fear superficiality is the Rowan's fate; the 104th incumbent of a seat where nonentities have been many and leaders of men but few. One starts to wonder if the archbishop in Canterbury is the amanuensis of the Lord Chancellor, since that role was lost to the Church under Henry VIII and became the preserve of the Law another offshoot of the Medieval Church.

Rowan is Risible. He states the blatantly obvious with the naivety only one cloistered in the common room could muster. There are in this world men and women dying for their Christianity while the Archbishop discusses his latest Guardian article over dinner and pontificates on some abstruse and irrelevant question as to how far biblical doctrine can bend before it needs rewriting